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    Amrita Hospital, Faridabad will be home to 2,400 beds and 81 speciality departments and is poised to become an institution where technology and expertise blend seamlessly with empathy and attention to detail.

    The new hospital in Faridabad Sector – 88 has been designed with its environmental impact at the forefront. The architects began by using construction materials that comply with national and international green building standards

    Spanning 130 acres of land, the country’s largest private hospital is opening its doors with a vision that is founded upon compassion and guided by science. Amrita Hospital, Faridabad will be home to 2,400 beds and 81 speciality departments and is poised to become an institution where technology and expertise blend seamlessly with empathy and attention to detail. In order to truly achieve this, the hospital must go beyond its medical goals and also care for its natural surroundings.

    With this in mind, the new hospital in Faridabad Sector – 88 has been designed with its environmental impact at the forefront. The architects began by using construction materials that comply with national and international green building standards. They also developed facilities that have a minimal carbon footprint, zero wastewater discharge, and will eventually be solar-powered.

    In terms of daily needs, Amrita Hospitals has carefully addressed the issue of water supply, as it serves as a crucial link between humankind and the environment. With the impact of climate change increasing, water availability is a central factor in all facets of life and, obviously, healthcare is among the most urgent.

    One of Amrita Hospitals’ solutions has been to develop a rainwater-harvesting system that caters to the peak rainfall period. It then recharges its collection into the ground after adequate filtration via a specially designed sedimentation pit. Through combined use of efficient water fixtures and use of recycled water, a reduction of approximately 42% has been estimated in the use of potable water.

    To further support infrastructure, Amrita Hospitals is also deploying a network of electric vehicles to operate across the expanse of the property. In terms of waste products, it has created effective site and waste management systems to reduce pollution. This is always a tremendous challenge for medical institutions, as 15% of the waste generated consists of material that may be infectious, toxic or radioactive.

    “We began the design with a very clear understanding of what a world class healthcare facility would be and what a design would demand. There were many challenges in between, but all was resolved through a lot hard work, parallel research, and inputs with associated experts who worked with us,” said Mr Ranjan Gupta, the principal architect of Amrita Hospital, Faridabad.

    Amrita Hospitals is taking positive action in its environmental initiatives one step further by creating natural spaces within its property. It will keep 70% of the land as green areas by maintaining water bodies that support local plants and animals, alongside growing native plants and trees. There will also be organic farming throughout the grounds with 5.5 acres specifically converted to areas for regular cultivation.

    The initiatives of Amrita Hospitals have been led by its founder, Sri Mata Amritanandamayi Devi, who is affectionately called Amma. For her, it is an absolute priority that the Faridabad hospital undertake maximum efforts to maintain environmental balance in the area. The ecosystem there is delicate as pollution increases, weather patterns change too quickly, and some natural resources hang on a thread. Humankind must shift its actions.

    “In the past, there was a right time for everything. There was a certain month to plant and a certain month to harvest. Farmers depended entirely on rainwater and sun, which were graciously granted by Nature. People lived in harmony with nature. They never tried to challenge it. For this reason, nature helped man. She was his friend,” said Amma.

    “But things have changed. The constant damage done by human beings ended the patience of nature, and natural disasters are increasing dramatically. This is the cause of all the suffering that human beings are going through in the present age. It is necessary for the human mind to harmonise, then nature will spontaneously harmonise as well.”

    Amma continues that although natural disasters are increasing, there is no need to panic. To restore humankind’s balance with Mother Earth, actions can be taken on a step-by-step basis. The world’s environmental crisis is not something we can resolve overnight. A small gesture by each one of us brings about a large result when all endeavours are considered in the collective tally.

    The Mata Amritanandamayi Math has pioneered many environmental initiatives, including a ₹100-crore contribution to the Central Government’s Namami Gange, its own ₹100-crore project to build toilets in rural Kerala, the Amala Bharatam Campaign to clean up public spaces, organic farming in rural India, and a tree planting project by AYUDH, the Math’s youth organisation. However, the most forward-looking action has been Saukhyam Reusable Pads—a menstrual pad made with banana fibre and cotton to replace the need for disposable plastic products.

    In terms of its own contribution, Amrita Hospital, Faridabad has already been recognised for its efforts in the field of environmental consciousness.India’s Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) has selected the hospital and its infrastructure as a part of 100 Energy Efficient Model Buildings. The Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (GRIHA) has also awarded it with exemplary performance for integrated water management.

    With a balanced focus on patient care and care for the environment, Amrita Hospitals supports health and wellbeing on physical and mental levels. By connecting with nature in this way, the hospital creates a surrounding ambience of healing and peace for all who arrive. This positive influence can then continue through their families, friends, and communities at large, and next lead to a better future for coming generations.